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Fidel La Barba was an Olympic gold medalist, a world champion boxer, a Hollywood screenwriter who wrote movies for Shirley Temple, Randolph Scott, Betty Grable and Victor Mature, and a Stanford University graduate who enjoyed a 10-year career as a sports writer after his boxing days were over.

He was also a father to John La Barba, who joined us Oct. 23 to tell stories about his legendary dad. Don't miss this sensational conversation about a boxer who won his first world title two years before Babe Ruth hit 60 home runs.

Our interview with John La Barba is preceded by John J. Raspanti's chat with Chicago-based super middleweight Mike "Hollywood" Jimenez (20-1-1, 14 KOs), as well as expert analysis by Raspanti and Rizwaan Zahid about David Lemieux's future, Oscar De La Hoya's revelation that he knew he was in for a beating the night he faced Manny Pacquiao, a breakdown of the Donaire-Magdaleno fight and the Frampton-Santa Cruz rematch, and more.


In his 24 pro fights, 'Gentleman' Jim Corbett fought nine times against International Boxing Hall of Famers and handed the great John L. Sullivan the first loss of his career.
Corbett was slick and handsome, but hardly a gentleman, becoming one of the sport's early smack-talkers, an annoyance that created a lifetime rift between he and Sullivan.
Christopher James Shelton, the world's most industrious boxing historian, joined us on Oct. 16 to talk about the unusual career and remarkable life of the turn-of-the-century heavyweight king, including his stranger-than-fiction business relationship with inventor Thomas Edison.

Our conversation with Chris Shelton is preceded by expert analysts Rizwaan Zahid and John J. Raspanti, who discuss the landscape of the heavyweight division, Danny Garcia's choice of opponents, how a Spence-Brook fight might look, who wins Haye vs. Bellew, the Hall of Fame credentials of Dariusz Michelczewski, and Manny Pacquiao's typically odd training camp.


Just four years out of high school, Jeff Bumpus found himself in a fight with world champion Julio Cesar Chavez (45-0, 43 KOs). His mom, a Sunday School teacher, was so horrified that her husband got her drunk for the fight. Bumpus, who had dreams of being "Rocky," just wanted to avoid making Chavez angry. That plan went out the window early in the fight, when Bumpus landed one of the best punches of his life on Chavez's chin. For the rest of this story, check out this fun and revealing interview from Sundays show .... or purchase Bumpus' new book, "Becoming Taz: Writing from the Southpaw Stance."

Sunday's semi-main event was Melissa McMorrow, who shares her thoughts with John J. Raspanti as she preps for yet another fight in Mexico.

And we lead off with expert analysts John J. Raspanti, Travis Hartman, and Rizwaan Zahid , who eulogize one of the greatest 140-pound fighters ever, Aaron "The Hawk" Pryor, who died early Sunday morning. They also tell us which heavyweight is the best in the world right now.


Henry Armstrong became the undisputed featherweight champion of the world in Oct. 1937, moved up 21 pounds to take the welterweight crown from all-time great Barney Ross the following May, and then, three months later, dropped to 135 to beat Hall of Fame lightweight king Lou Ambers.
Edward Scott Jr., the grandson of "Homicide Hank," was our featured guest on this edition of The Ringside Boxing Show to discuss the life and legend of Henry Armstrong, who became a Baptist minister and created the Henry Armstrong Foundation to serve at-risk youth. Scott has made the foundation his life's work in his grandfather's memory.
Our interview with Edward Scott Jr. is preceded by a colorful conversation with unbeaten heavyweight David Latoria, who, in his other job, is a Chicago Police officer.
And, as always, expert analysts Travis Hartman, Rizwaan Zahid and John J. Raspanti lead off, breaking down Tyson Fury's cocaine mess, Manny Pacquiao's inexplicable political alignment with a Philippines president who admires Hitler, the mouthwatering Walters-Lomachenko fight, and more.


When you've spent decades thinking deep thoughts about boxing, you tend to pick up a few things. We went deep for 30 minutes with West Coast trainers Abel Sanchez and Max Garcia, discussing a cornucopia of topics:
This is a rapid-paced, short-attention-span, interview that covers a dozen different topics that all fight fans wonder about.

This unusual dissection of the sport's mysteries is preceded by a check-in from expert analysts Travis Hartman and John J. Raspanti on the West Coast Boxing Hall of Fame, Tyson Fury's troubles, Anthony Joshua's rush down glory road, a health report on the sport, and more.



Rick Farris was an amateur boxing champ who fought 19 times as a pro, was stablemates with Jerry Quarry, sparred with Roberto Duran, Alexis Arguello, Ruben Olivares, Carlos Ortiz, "Schoolboy" Bobby Chacon, Danny "Little Red" Lopez, met gangster Mickey Cohen, became a celebrated Hollywood lighting director, and founded the West Coast Boxing Hall of Fame.

Think he's got stories? You're right.


Armando Muniz never won a world championship, but fought Hal of Famers for the welterweight crown four times -- twice against Carlos Palomino, two other tmes against Jose Napoles. He also went to war with most of the premiere 147-pound fighters of his time -- everybody from Emile Griffith to Sugar Ray Leonard -- and was impressive enough to gain induction into the now-defunct World Boxing Hall of Fame.

Muniz was the featured guest on Sunday's Ringside Boxing Show, preceded by determined Puerto Rican contender Orlando Del Valle, who discussed his upcoming Pay-Per-View date with Diego De La Hoya.

As always, our show opened with the expert analysis of Rizwaan Zahid and John J. Raspanti, who unpack the Golovkin-Brook and Chocolatito-Cuadras fights from the night before.


Before he won the first of his two Golden Globe Awards for portraying small-town tough guy "John Milner" in the iconic film, "American Graffiti," actor Paul Le Mat was an amateur boxing star in Los Angeles. In fact, right before he got that role, Le Mat won the Los Angeles Diamond Belt championship, the same tournament that crowned future world champions Mike Weaver, Bobby Chacon and Alberto Davila.

Le Mat joined us on The Ringside Boxing Show to discuss boxing, Hollywood, and the five novels he's written.

This fun conversation about wild times with Harrison Ford, Richard Dreyfus, and Sugar Ray Robinson is preceded by a breakdown of Robert Guerrero's stunning loss to Argentine cab driver David Peralta, the downward spiral of Ricky Hatton, and other intriguing topics by our expert analysts, Rizwaan Zahid and John J. Raspanti.


We missed connections Sunday with our scheduled guest, so we replayed a classic interview we did in 2010 with the great Kevin Kelley, one of the pound-for-pound greats of his era.

Our conversation with 'The Flushing Flash' is preceded by Travis Hartman, Rizwaan Zahid, and John J. Raspanti, our expert analysts, who break down an interesting week in at the Rio Olympics, preview Golovkin vs. Brook, and evaluate whether Jarrell 'Big Baby' Miller is the real thing or just another fat American heavyweight.


The West Coast Boxing Hall of Fame will enshrine 13 legends on Sept. 25, including Tony "The Tiger" Lopez, who won three world titles, fought Rocky Lockridge in the 1988 "Fight of the Year," and went to war against Jorge Paez, Joey Gamache, Greg Haugen, Charles Murray, Freddie Pendleton and Julio Cesar Chavez, to name just a few.
The Pride of Sacramento (who ran for mayor last year) joined us Aug. 14 to talk about his thrill-packed career and his impending enshrinement.

This show also includes John J. Raspanti's interview with another Sacramento star, Guy Robb, who is 18-1 and gearing up for his biggest test yet in the featherweight division.

And Raspanti, Travis Hartman and Rizwaan Zahid lament Antonio Margarito's inexplicable boxing license, weigh in on Kell Brook's 176-pound 30-day weigh-in, the differences between Canelo and Chavez Jr., and other topics.


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