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By Dennis Taylor

On a once-complex heavyweight landscape, Deontay Wilder stands alone today as the bona fide rival of Anthony Joshua.

"The Bronze Bomber" granted us a lengthy, wide-ranging, in-depth interview on this week's Ringside Boxing Show, addressing everything from boxing's epidemic of performance-enhancing drugs (three of Wilder's recent opponents have tested dirty), to his upcoming rematch with Bermane Stiverne (the only opponent to go the distance with Wilder in 38 fights), to Eddie Hearn's push to lure Wilder to England for a stadium fight, and short-change him on the purse.

This spectacular (and humor-filled) conversation is perfectly timed on the same weekend that Joshua fought Carlos Takam, and a week before Wilder-Stiverne.

Before we speak with Deontay, expert analysts Travis Hartman, Rizwaan Zahid, and John J. Raspanti break down the week of boxing, including Joshua-Takam, Terence Crawford's confirmation that he's moving to the talent-loaded welterweight division, Katie Taylor's chances of taking women's boxing to a new level, and more.

Dennis Taylor is host of The Ringside Boxing Show, editor/publisher of www.ringsideboxingshow.com, and co-author (with John J. Raspanti) of the West Coast Boxing Hall of Fame's 2017 Book of the Year, "Intimate Warfare: The True Story of the Arturo Gatti vs. Micky Ward Boxing Trilogy," currently on Amazon's Bestsellers list.

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By Dennis Taylor
The elephant in the room when we watch 21st-century heavyweights is obvious: Why should a 201-pound man be required to compete for a world title with a 6-foot-8, 250-pound behemoth? The WBC has made rumblings in recent days about creating a (long overdue?) super heavyweight division -- which would be the 18th weight class in a sport that once had just eight. Good idea? Will other sanctioning bodies follow that lead?
 
Expert analysts Travis Hartman, Rizwaan Zahid and John J. Raspanti weigh in on this topic, plus Chris Eubank Jr's emergence as a force in the World Boxing Super Series, Mikey vs. Linares, Cotto's uninspiring opponent for his finale, Bellew's decision to fight Haye again, and more.
 
We also get our weekly report from UK correspondent Paul McLaughlin before connecting with former IBF super welterweight champ Paul Vaden, whose life outside the ring was as compelling as a career that earned him a place in the West Coast Boxing Hall of Fame.
 
Dennis Taylor is host of The Ringside Boxing Show, editor/publisher of www.ringsideboxingshow.com, and co-author (with John J. Raspanti) of "Intimate Warfare: The True Story of the Arturo Gatti and Micky Ward Boxing Trilogy," currently on Amazon's Bestsellers list.
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What do they take us for? Manny Pacquiao and Freddie Roach are trying to convince us that Australian Jeff Horn (16-0-1, no A-list opponents) is an inspiring threat to the future Hall of Famer.

Meanwhile, Colin McGregor's promoter, UFC czar Dana White, says his fighter (0-0) is no joking matter for Floyd Mayweather (49-0).

Our expert analysts, Travis Hartman and John J. Raspanti, unpack both match-ups, psychoanalyze supporters of the underdogs, and also tell us what to expect from Broner vs. Mikey, and speculate about a possible Rigondeaux-Lomachenko collision.

This wide-reaching discussion is followed by an eye-opening interview with Adrian Clark, a 31-year-old boxing manager/agent (and author of Protect Yourself At All Times) who is on a quest to convince fighters that people who want 33 percent of their purses are ripping them off in a very big way.

This is a conversation guaranteed to enlighten fighters, managers, promoters and fans of "The Sweet Science."

NOTE TO LISTENERS: The Ringside Boxing Show is now a proud member of thegruelingtruth.net sports network. Please check us out there!

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Montell Griffin's storybook career had a few unhappily-ever-after episodes that still grate on his nerves all these years later, at age 47.

His father owned the Windy City Boxing Gym, which was Montell's home away from home until his dad passed away at age 12. At that point, his mother pulled him out of the sport through his teen years, until he finally split for Los Angeles to resume training as an 18-year-old.

Against all odds, Griffin made the 1992 U.S. Olympic Boxing Team and went to Barcelona with a squad that included Oscar De La Hoya, Julian Wheeler, Raul Marquez, Chris Byrd, Tim Austin, and Larry Donald.

Unfortunately, those were the first Olympics to use the new electronic scoring system, which routinely awarded points to the wrong fighter -- a snafu that eliminated Griffin before the medal round.

After turning pro (where he was trained from his eighth fight on by the legendary Eddie Futch), Griffin won his first 14, then stepped into the ring with future Hall of Famer James Toney, who already was 44-1 and a former world champion. Griffin not only upset Toney, but also won a rematch the following year.

That put him inthe ring with undefeated world champion Roy Jones Jr.., the No. 1 pound-for-pound fighter in the world at the time -- a fight Griffin was winning going into the ninth round, when Jones was DQ'd for hitting his opponent while he was on a knee.

Fans trolled Griffin after that, adding to a career filled with disappointment and disillusionment.

This is a remarkable 20-minute interview with a colorful fighter who deserved better from a career that spanned from 1993-2011.

Our interview with Montell Griffin is preceded, as always, by our expert analysts, Travis Hartman, Rizwaan Zahid, and John J. Raspanti, who discuss the weekend victories by Adonis Stevenson and Eleider Alvarez, the skullduggery involving Team Ward and Kovalev trainer John J. Raspanti, and the claim by a Sky Sports reporter that Deontay Wilder was knocked out cold -- twice -- while sparring with Wladimir Klitschko.

This is a rockin' show with a lot of revelations.

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In his last fight against Chris Arreola, Deontay Wilder not only broke his right hand, but he also tore his right biceps muscle. Recovering from those two injuries required both surgery and time, but Wilder sees a blessing: Like Larry Holmes, he returned to the gym early -- even before he was healed -- working exclusively with the left. The result, he says, has been the development of a new level of skill with his jab -- exactly what happened to Holmes, who became one of the legendary jabbers in heavyweight history.

That new weopon will be on display Feb.25 in Wilder's hometown of Birmingham, Ala.

This high-energy conversation also delves into Wilder's opinion of boxers who use Performance Enhancing Drugs, including two-time abuser Alexander Povetkin, whose fight with Wilder before he tested dirty in 2015.

Our interview with the undefeated WBC heavyweight champ is preceded by John J. Raspanti and Rizwaan Zahid's breakdown of the sensational rematch between Leo Santa Cruz and Carl Frampton, and Mikey Garcia's spectacular knockout victory over previously unbeaten world champion Dejan Zlatichinan, in Showtime's Saturday telecast.

A lively and enlightening show, front to back.

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The Ringside Boxing Show has moved!

As of MONDAY, JAN. 9, 2017, The Ringside Boxing Show will broadcast worldwide from www.blogtalkradio.com/ringside-boxing-show beginning at 5 p.m. Pacific, 6 Mountain, 7 Central, 8 Eastern.

"Follow" us to receive our alerts.

We alos will continue to post every broadcast at this Podbean location.

Please do us a solid: Help us grow by posting this notice on your social media sites!

Thanks, Ringside Nation!

Dennis Taylor (host), Travis Hartman, Rizwaan Zahid and John J. Raspanti (expert analysts), and Christopher James Shelton (boxing historian).

Email us at contact@ringsideboxingshow.com We want to hear from you.

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 Paulie Malignaggi grew up on Brooklyn's mean streets with an abusive stepfather, but recognized boxing as an alternative to vice and crime. Since turning pro, he's had a rocky road and more than one rise to the top, but he may well be at this career peak right now: He's popular, relevant, a reigning world champ and, maybe best of all, a rising star as a ringside analyst for Showtime.

 "The Magic Man" granted us an extra-long interview, talking about his life, his career, and his future. This one started our year with a bang.

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Steve Farhood's 33 years as a boxing journalist began with skull sessions from no less than Eddie Futch and Angelo Dundee. He worked as editor of The Ring Magazine. And he currently is best known as the expert analyst for ShoBox: The New Generation on the Showtime Network.

Our conversation with Farhood centered on what makes boxers tick, how bad do they hurt, the psychology of their craft and other seld0m-explored topics. Enjoy this fascinating talk with a true insider of the sport from our Oct. 16, 2011 edition of The Ringside Boxing Show.

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