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 Tony DeMarco won the welterweight championship of the world in 1955, beating Johnny Saxton by TKO in the 14th round of a fight whose brutality typified the career of the "Boston Bomber."

  His 14-year career included spectacular battles with Carmen Basilio, Virgil Aikens, Gaspar Ortega and Kid Gavilan, among others, during The Golden Age of Boxing.

 In his heyday, during one 18 month stretch, DeMarco fought 10 times against the toughest opposition in the division.

 On Jan. 14, 2017, DeMarco celebrated his 85th birthday in Boston. This interview, conducted by Dennis Taylor, "Irish" Joe O'Rourke, and David Duenez of "Leave It In The Ring," took place in 2012, five days before his 80th birthday.

 Our Tony DeMarco replay is preceded by our expect analysts, Rizwaan Zahid and John J. Raspanti, who dissect Saturday's spectacular super middleweight unification brawl between Badou Jack and James DeGale, the coming-out party of Gervonta Davis in the semi-main event, Julio Cesar Chavez Jr's challenge of making weight against Canelo or paying a $1 million-per-pound fine, and a look forward at Frampton-Santa Cruz II, Garcia-Thurman, and Cotto-Kirkland.

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David Rodriguez was climbing toward the top of the boxing world -- he was 36-0, with 34 knockouts -- but his life wasn't as it appeared.

Rodriguez suffered from depression, alcohol and drug abuse, and, by his own account, arrogance in 2011, when his world came crashing down. Early in the year, he nearly killed himself with a toxic cocktail of drugs and alcohol. Then, in December, he got into parking lot altercation with four assailants, one of whom slashed his throat so badly that doctors couldn't believe he lived.

While recovering, he began writing his life story as a diary -- etchings that became a meteoric autobiography, When The Lights Go Out, which is now getting five-star reviews from readers and literary critics, alike.

The once-promising boxer walked away from the sport and spends much of his time nowadays as an inspirational speaker, often talking to children about bullying.

Rodriguez joined us on our first show of 2017 to tell the story of his astonishing, life-changing journey.

This remarkable interview is preceded by a conversation with our expert analyst, John J. Raspanti of MaxBoxing.com, recapping 2016 and previewing weeks ahead.

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As of MONDAY, JAN. 9, 2017, The Ringside Boxing Show will broadcast worldwide from www.blogtalkradio.com/ringside-boxing-show beginning at 5 p.m. Pacific, 6 Mountain, 7 Central, 8 Eastern.

"Follow" us to receive our alerts.

We alos will continue to post every broadcast at this Podbean location.

Please do us a solid: Help us grow by posting this notice on your social media sites!

Thanks, Ringside Nation!

Dennis Taylor (host), Travis Hartman, Rizwaan Zahid and John J. Raspanti (expert analysts), and Christopher James Shelton (boxing historian).

Email us at contact@ringsideboxingshow.com We want to hear from you.

We open this show with a lively 30-minute discussion of Bernard Hopkins' brutal exit from the ring, the coming-out party of Joe Smith Jr., Alexander Povetkin's future after a second-straight dirty drug test, Golovkin vs. Jacobs, Terence Crawford's 50-day jail sentence, Canelo-Chavez Jr., Andre Ward retirement romors, and the WBC's strange decisoni to ban dad's as chief seconds for their boxing sons.

And then, when a scheduled guest cancels, we replay a classic interview with Australian legend Jeff Fenech, whose life was as colorful as his career was great.

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International Boxing Hall of Famer did two separate terms as editor-in-chief of The Ring magazine, and also oversaw Boxing Illustrated, Ring Almanac, KO and World Boxing.

We tapped into Collins' rich history as a fight scribe and got him to reminisce about over-capacity fight nights at the Blue Horizon, gangster Blinky Palermo, Lou Duva, Muhammad Ali, and his own stormy departure from The Ring.

This is a candid and colorful conversation with a legend of boxing journalism.

Before our interview with Nigel Collins, John J. Raspanti catcches up with Sacramento-based junior welterweight Stan Martinyouk, who expects 2017 to be a breakout year.

And we lead off with rapid-fire postmortem of a spectacular boxing Saturday with Travis Hartman, Rizwaan Zahid, and John J. Raspanti, who break down Parker-Ruz, Charlo-Williams, Crawford-Molina, Whyte-Chisora, Joshua-Mollina, and Mares-Cuellar -- all in 20 minutes.

Front to back, this is one of our best shows of the year.

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He fell in love with boxing young, turned pro late, and has made the most of his career, becoming one of the true action-figure warriors of his time. But John Molina Jr. probably faces his toughest task this Saturday, taking on undefeated world champion Terance Crawford with two title belts on the line.

Molina discussed his life in and out of the ring with John J. Raspanti on the Dec. 4 edition of The Ringside Boxing Show, giving us a candid look at one of the sport's most-popular personalities.

OUr John Molina interview is preceded by Raspanti, Travis Hartman and Rizwaan Zahid on Nick Blackwell's dangerous devoition to boxing, Murat Gassiev's place in a talent-rich cruiserweight division, David Haye's decision to fight Tony Bellew, and more.

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Her dad, Javier "Baby Face" Gutierrez, was a California Boxing Hall of Famer who didn't think girls should play sports, let alone box, but Blanca Gutierrez fell hard for the sport anyway.

Gutierrez became a national-level kickboxer at 32 -- she even fought Carina Moreno on ESPN once -- and opened her own gym when she felt unwelcome at most men's gyms.

Nowadays, she's the promoter of the Beautiful Brawlers all-female boxing shows in the San Francisco Bay area, trying to kick the door open for women's boxers in the U.S.

We spoke to Gutierrez about her life, her dad, and her passion for the Sweet Science on the Nov. 27 edition of The Ringside Boxing Show.

Before Blanca, we break down Lomachenko's stunning domination of Nicholas Walters -- what the win did for Lomachanko, and what the defeat did to Walters -- with expert analysts Travis Hartman, Rizwaan Zahid, and John J. Raspanti.

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Loreto Garza learned to fight in his back yard as the youngest of seven, sparring with three older brothers, but was 18 before he finally made it to a boxing gym. Over the next three years, he won three Golden Gloves titles and made Team USA, then turned pro just before his 21st birthday in 1983 -- the same year another Sacramento superstar, Tony "The Tiger" Lopez, made his pro debut.

Garza lost his sixth pro fight, then went on a 23-0-1 run that included knockout wins over former world champions Harry Arroyo and Joe Manley. He then won an electrifying fight over 5-foot-3 Frankie Warren (30-1, his only loss to Buddy McGirt), a bout that many people thought should have been "Fight of the Year." Garza fought the final five rounds with his right eye swollen shut, but Warren came out worse: He retired after that fight after discovering that the retina in one of his eyes had been torn in two places.

Garza's world title fight was in Nice, France, on two weeks notice, against Juan Coggi, who was 45-1, and his majority-decisioni upset victory brought hundreds of fans to the Sacramento airport for his return home.

After a memorable war with Vinny Pazienza (a Garza victory) and a meeting with future Hall of Famer Edwin Rosario (a knockout loss), Garza retired and became a correctional officer for the State of California.

Don't miss this sensational interview with a member of the California Boxing Hall of Fame and a Northern California boxing legend.

Our interview with Loreto Garza is preceded by an enlightening postmortem of the previous night's Andre Ward-Sergey Kovalev showdown by expert analysts Travis Hartman, Rizwaan Zahid, and John J. Raspanti.

This is a lively show, wall to wall.

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Few fighters of this generation are as reliable as Shawn Porter for giving fans every penny of their ticket price. He's one of the true action-figure boxing stars of this era.

"Showtime" Shawn joined us on 11-13-16 for a 30-minute conversation about one of boxing's most-intriguing weight divisions -- the welterweights -- and where he fits into the picture with Thurman, Garcia, Brook, Spence, Berto, Khan, Pacquiao, Mayweather, and others.

We also hit him up for stories of high school football glory -- as a running back, he once scored six touchdowns in a game, setting a record (previously held by NFL Hall of Famer Larry Czonka) that still stands today.

Our conversation with Shawn Porter is preceded by a postmortem the weekend fights (Danny Garcia-Samuel Vargas, Luis Ortiz-Malik Scott) by expert analysts Travis Hartman, Rizwaan Zahid and John J. Raspanti, who also discuss a possible Brook-Spence showdown, whether Canelo should bother fighting Chavez Jr., how much hot air Bob Arum is blowing when he talks up a Crawford-Pacquiao match, and other topics.

 

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They've been fighting for years without gloves, without headgear, without judges, in warehouses, parking garages, basements ...wherever the cops aren't looking for them. Now the Bare Knuckle Fighting organization is progressing toward becoming mainstream as a fully sanctioned sport -- and they've already made inroads in three states.

Former world cruiserweight boxing champion Bobby Gunn, bare knuckle boxing's undefeated heavyweight king (73-0, 73 KOs), and Edward Simpson, a management consultant for the organization, joined us on Sunday's Ringside Boxing Show to discuss the ancient, noble art of fistfighting, and why it may soon be coming to an arena, and hopefully a cable TV network, near you.

Do not miss this sensational conversation about the next generation of sanction combat sports.

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