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Archive for June 2017

What do they take us for? Manny Pacquiao and Freddie Roach are trying to convince us that Australian Jeff Horn (16-0-1, no A-list opponents) is an inspiring threat to the future Hall of Famer.

Meanwhile, Colin McGregor's promoter, UFC czar Dana White, says his fighter (0-0) is no joking matter for Floyd Mayweather (49-0).

Our expert analysts, Travis Hartman and John J. Raspanti, unpack both match-ups, psychoanalyze supporters of the underdogs, and also tell us what to expect from Broner vs. Mikey, and speculate about a possible Rigondeaux-Lomachenko collision.

This wide-reaching discussion is followed by an eye-opening interview with Adrian Clark, a 31-year-old boxing manager/agent (and author of Protect Yourself At All Times) who is on a quest to convince fighters that people who want 33 percent of their purses are ripping them off in a very big way.

This is a conversation guaranteed to enlighten fighters, managers, promoters and fans of "The Sweet Science."

NOTE TO LISTENERS: The Ringside Boxing Show is now a proud member of thegruelingtruth.net sports network. Please check us out there!

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A few months ago, Sergey Kovalev was an undefeated world champion and undisputed king of the mountain in boxing's light heavyweight division. Then came his two collisions with Andre Ward, resulting in two losses -- both bubbling with controversy.

Our expert analysts, Travis Hartman, Rizwaan Zahid, and John J. Raspanti discuss Saturday's stunning eighth-round TKO victory by Ward, which Team Kovalev insists was the result of multiple low blows that went unheeded by referee Tony Weeks. The loss becomes even more bitter in the light of their first fight -- a unanimous decision to Ward that was unpopular with at least half of the boxing public. So, where do both fighters go from here?

Our Ward-Kovalev coversation is followed by an interview with welterweight prospect Alan Sanchez, and our classic interview from January 2016 with Hall of Famer Eddie Mustafa Muhammad.

 

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Paul Banke knocked out a future Hall of Famer, Daniel Zaragoza, to win the WBC super bantamweight crown in 1990, but by then he was already adrift into the dangerous world of substance abuse.

The hard-partying fighter had just one successful title defense, and his once-promising career ended just three years after the Zaragoza triumph, but his battle with the effects of crystal meth (among other drugs) is a battle he's waged throughout his life.

Twenty-two years ago, in 1995, he was diagnosed with full-blown AIDS (probably from needle sharing or unprotected sex), a disease that, in those days, was tantamount to a death sentence. With the help of a daily cocktail of medications, he has persevered, enduring 13 failed rehab stays before finally resolving to end the cycle of substance abuse at age 50.

Now 52, Banke is clean and sober, working with boxers, and celebrating life with the support of a strong contingent of friends. He's also being inducted this year into the West Coast Boxing Hall of Fame.

This memorable interview with Paul Banke is preceeded by John J. Raspanti's conversation with Mike "Hollywood" Jimenez, a super middleweight from Chicago scheduled to put his 20-1-1 record on the line June 23 in a rematch with Aaron Pryor Jr.

Before that, we talk to our expert analysts, Travis Hartman, Rizwaan Zahid, and Raspanti about the breakout performance of welterweight Regis Prograis (who TKO'd previously undefeated Joel Diaz Jr. on Friday), and the upcoming rematch between Andre Ward and Sergey Kovalev.

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Montell Griffin's storybook career had a few unhappily-ever-after episodes that still grate on his nerves all these years later, at age 47.

His father owned the Windy City Boxing Gym, which was Montell's home away from home until his dad passed away at age 12. At that point, his mother pulled him out of the sport through his teen years, until he finally split for Los Angeles to resume training as an 18-year-old.

Against all odds, Griffin made the 1992 U.S. Olympic Boxing Team and went to Barcelona with a squad that included Oscar De La Hoya, Julian Wheeler, Raul Marquez, Chris Byrd, Tim Austin, and Larry Donald.

Unfortunately, those were the first Olympics to use the new electronic scoring system, which routinely awarded points to the wrong fighter -- a snafu that eliminated Griffin before the medal round.

After turning pro (where he was trained from his eighth fight on by the legendary Eddie Futch), Griffin won his first 14, then stepped into the ring with future Hall of Famer James Toney, who already was 44-1 and a former world champion. Griffin not only upset Toney, but also won a rematch the following year.

That put him inthe ring with undefeated world champion Roy Jones Jr.., the No. 1 pound-for-pound fighter in the world at the time -- a fight Griffin was winning going into the ninth round, when Jones was DQ'd for hitting his opponent while he was on a knee.

Fans trolled Griffin after that, adding to a career filled with disappointment and disillusionment.

This is a remarkable 20-minute interview with a colorful fighter who deserved better from a career that spanned from 1993-2011.

Our interview with Montell Griffin is preceded, as always, by our expert analysts, Travis Hartman, Rizwaan Zahid, and John J. Raspanti, who discuss the weekend victories by Adonis Stevenson and Eleider Alvarez, the skullduggery involving Team Ward and Kovalev trainer John J. Raspanti, and the claim by a Sky Sports reporter that Deontay Wilder was knocked out cold -- twice -- while sparring with Wladimir Klitschko.

This is a rockin' show with a lot of revelations.

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